Articles by date

07 April 2009

Online gaming in China: Intangible value - Changyou is making a fortune selling items in a virtual world (The Economist)

Perhaps it should not be a surprise. In the midst of a global capital shortage, the first company to list this year on New York's NASDAQ exchange not only needs no money; its source of profit is receiving cash for items that do not exist.

Read full article

Concern on Australia's broadband security (The Age)

A $10 billion-plus tender to build a new national broadband network will finally be unveiled this week, but the Opposition is warning that national security concerns must be paramount in determining the winner, reports The Age.

Read full article

Several options open on Australia's national broadband network (The Australian)

Late last year, the Rudd Government rejected Telstra's proposal for a new Telstra-owned national broadband network. That was the easy part, reports The Australian.

Read full article

US Internet Providers Gird for Fight With FCC (Wall Street Journal)

Cable and telephone companies are gearing up for a fight as regulators begin work Wednesday on a national broadband strategy that could bring major changes to how Internet services are delivered to American homes.

Read full article

21st century Lent: US Christians go green, give up new media (ABC News)

From giving up their cars to abandoning their Facebook pages, many Christians in the United States are being called on to help reduce global warming and turn their backs on internet distractions over Lent.

Read full article

05 April 2009

Google is just an amoral menace: The ever-growing empire produces nothing but seems determined to control everything (The Observer)

If indeed a new era of global responsibility has come into being with measures that actually restrain banks and isolate tax havens, it may be time for the planet's dominant economic powers to focus on the destructive, anti-civic forces of the internet. Exactly 20 years after Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote the blueprint for the world wide web, the internet has become the host to a small number of dangerous WWMs - worldwide monopolies that sweep all before them with exuberant contempt for people's rights, their property and the past.

Read full article

Death on the Net (Independent on Sunday)

Twittering, the online activity du jour, was suddenly everywhere last week, even in the mainstream print media. A sure sign, perhaps, that it has peaked, and is on the road to the graveyard for once-fashionable internet crazes.

Read full article

EC Celebrates Third Anniversary of .EU

The European Commission is celebrating three years of the .EU top level domain being made available to all and that there are now more than three million domain names cementing its position in the top ten TLDs.

Read full article

France approves main section of tough anti-P2P bill (ars technica)

France's Assemblée Nationale has been debating a strict, government-backed graduated response bill for several weeks. As the final vote nears, the bill's core section has been adopted and its passage looks likely.

Read full article

Cyberbullying 'affects 1 in 10 British teachers' (The Guardian)

More than one in 10 teachers are bullied by pupils and colleagues through text messages, emails and social networking sites, new research shows.

Read full article

Google sees voice search as core (BBC News)

Google has said it sees voice search as a major opportunity for the company in building a presence on the mobile web.

Read full article

Facebook 'good for productivity', in moderation (ABC News)

Employers worried that their staff are wasting their time on websites like Facebook, MySpace and YouTube may now be able to relax a bit. A new study has found that workers who surf the net from their office are actually more productive than those who don't.

Read full article

Swedish internet use plummets after filesharing curb introduced (The Guardian)

Internet traffic in Sweden - previously a hotbed of illicit filesharing - has fallen dramatically following the introduction of a law banning online piracy.

Read full article

Royalty Dispute Stops Music Videos in Germany (New York Times)

YouTube has stopped showing music videos in Germany as a dispute over royalty payments in Europe spreads.

Read full article

Google's Plan for Out-of-Print Books Is Challenged (New York Times)

The dusty stacks of the nation's great university and research libraries are full of orphans -- books that the author and publisher have essentially abandoned. They are out of print, and while they remain under copyright, the rights holders are unknown or cannot be found.

Read full article

FBI: Internet Fraud Rates Rose 33% (Washington Post)

Internet fraud complaints to the FBI by consumers increased more than 33 percent in 2008 over the previous year, according to figures released this week.

Read full article

Google In Talks To Acquire Twitter... Or Is It? (TechCrunch)

Here's a heck of a rumor that we've sourced from two separate people close to the negotiations: Google is in late stage negotiations to acquire Twitter. We don't know the price but can assume its well, well north of the $250 million valuation that they saw in their recent funding.

Read full article

Briton's personal web data to be stored for a year (The Independent)

The mobile calls, emails and website visits of every person in Britain will be stored for a year under sweeping new powers which come into force on Monday. Privacy campaigners warned last night that the information would be used by the Government to create a giant "Big Brother" super-database containing a map of everyone's private life.

Read full article

04 April 2009

Why Korea Isn't Rushing To 4G (Forbes)

Super-wired South Korea easily outranks the U.S. in most measures of broadband. But that might just change. In a surprising twist, with help from Korean companies, the U.S. could win the race to upgrade cellular networks to faster mobile broadband speeds.

Read full article

Conficker.c controls 4% of all infected PCs, IBM says (Computerworld)

As many as one out of every 25 Internet addresses that transmits potentially dangerous data over the Internet is infected with the Conficker.c worm, IBM Corp.'s security arm said today.

Read full article

Murdoch says papers should charge on web (Reuters)

Rupert Murdoch, whose media company News Corp owns one of the few U.S. newspapers that makes people pay to read its news on the Web, said more papers will have to start doing the same to survive.

Read full article

RIM Sells 50 Millionth BlackBerry (PC World)

Research In Motion Limited (RIM) stock soared in after-market trading after the company posted solid financial results and said it sold its 50 millionth BlackBerry smartphone.

Read full article

The Palm Pre Will Be an iPhone Killer (PC World)

Although a collective sigh may be raised at comparing yet another touch-screen smartphone with Apple's iPhone 3G, Palm's Pre has been generating plenty of buzz since it was unveiled at the Consumer Electronics Show earlier this year.

Read full article

David vs Goliath: CSIRO takes on big business over wi-fi patent (ABC News)

The CSIRO's legal win against Hewlett Packard over the use of its patented wireless technology could mean big bucks for the Australian science agency, says a patent attorney.

Read full article

iiNet tests legality of Conroy slur (Australian IT)

Perth-headquartered ISP iiNet said it has sought legal advice on Communications Minister Senator Stephen Conroy's public commentary on its legal defence in a high-profile copyright case before the NSW Federal Court.

Read full article

Registrar Solutions