Articles by date

09 June 2008

Consumer empowerment in communication services (OECD)

Improving the ability of consumers to choose between competing suppliers is important for well functioning markets. The report examines how to increase market flexibility for consumers in communication services, and improve access to information.

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us: A rallying cry against cyberbullying (CNet)

Lawmakers and Internet executives are perking up to the growing problem of kid bully fights on the Web.

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The Future of the Internet Economy: OECD Ministerial Meeting

Vint Cerf and Jonathan Zittrain are among those who have made short videos on the upcoming OECD Ministerial Meeting on "The Future of the Internet Economy", Seoul, Korea, 17-18 June 2008. Shaping Policies for Creativity, Confidence and Convergence in the Digital World "How can the Internet make the world a better place?" This is the question OECD is asking the public on YouTube, the leading online video community, at www.youtube.com/futureinternet. YouTube users can share their opinion with the leaders and opinion shapers attending the OECD Ministerial meeting on "The Future of the Internet Economy” in Seoul, Korea on 17-18 June 2008. OECD and YouTube invite you to participate:

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08 June 2008

More charges laid over Australian child porn bust (ABC)

Queensland police have charged another two men overnight as part of Operation Centurion, a major national child pornography investigation.

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Economics of malware: Security decisions, incentives and externalities (OECD)

While originating in criminal behaviour, the magnitude and impact of the malware phenomenon is also influenced by the decisions and behaviour of legitimate market players. This working paper is based on qualitative empirical research into the incentives of market players when dealing with malware.

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UK Government rejects more web regulation: Forcing ISPs to monitor content will not work (vnunet)

The government has rejected calls for greater web content monitoring in response to mounting pressure in the Commons for ISPs to be required to act as policemen.

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China takes broadband crown from U.S. (InfoWorld)

China takes broadband crown from U.S. China experienced a 28 percent increase in fixed broadband subscribers over last year, ending the quarter with 71.6 million subscribers -- 1.4 million more than the U.S.

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Watching while you surf (The Economist)

Online advertising: New ad-targeting systems, which determine users' interests by monitoring which websites they visit, are proving controversial

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US Groups appeal to Congress on ISP snooping (Los Angeles Times)

A coalition of privacy groups today asked Congress to investigate Internet service providers that have begun tracking individual Web surfing in order to show targeted ads.

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Bits, Bands and Books (New York Times)

... In 1994, one of those gurus, Esther Dyson, made a striking prediction: that the ease with which digital content can be copied and disseminated would eventually force businesses to sell the results of creative activity cheaply, or even give it away. Whatever the product -- software, books, music, movies -- the cost of creation would have to be recouped indirectly: businesses would have to "distribute intellectual property free in order to sell services and relationships."

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Icahn Presses Yahoo to Sell to Microsoft (New York Times)

Carl C. Icahn told Yahoo on Friday that it should offer to sell the company to Microsoft for US$34.375 a share, or about $48.7 billion.

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Keep It Short, Make It Instant: Instant Messaging (New York Times)

Some of us find those bouncing or flashing icons on computer screen to be disruptive and distracting. But apparently, many workers believe instant messaging causes less interruption than other forms of communication like phone calls, e-mail and talking face to face. Instant messaging means an increase in the number of conversations, but those conversations tend to be shorter.

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07 June 2008

Turkmenistan opens internet access to citizens (The Age)

Turkmenistan has begun allowing private citizens to connect to the Internet in the latest sign the reclusive Central Asian nation is opening up to the world.

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Call to prosecute BT for Phorm ad trial (BBC)

BT should face prosecution for its "illegal" trials of Phorm, a controversial ad-serving technology, a leading computer security researcher has said.

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us: Adviser Says McCain Backs Bush Wiretaps (New York Times)

A top adviser to Senator John McCain says Mr. McCain believes that President Bush's program of wiretapping without warrants was lawful, a position that appears to bring him into closer alignment with the sweeping theories of executive authority pushed by the Bush administration legal team.

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uk: Time taken to shut child abuse sites criticised (The Guardian)

UK child protection experts have called for greater efforts to patrol child abuse websites after a study revealed that it takes a month on average to take them down from the internet.

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us: More laws, collaboration required for online safety (Computerworld)

Washington state's attorney general is only half-joking when he suggests that perhaps sites like Facebook and MySpace should require members to use a credit card to sign up for access as a way to prove their identity.

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Swedish gov't to vote on allowing email, phone monitoring (Network World)

Sweden is about to vote on a bill that will allow local authorities to monitor all types of wired traffic, including emails, fax messages and telephone calls.

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uk: Voluntary code for internet speed (BBC)

The way broadband speeds are advertised is to be regulated under a voluntary code published by Ofcom. It wants companies to publish accurate estimates of the maximum connection speeds people can expect before they buy broadband packages.

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06 June 2008

Excluding Keyword Categories From Your Parked Pages In Order To Avoid Cybersquatting Violations (Traverse Legal)

Parking companies are handcuffed in many ways by their relationship with Google and Yahoo, who essentially control the framework by which ads are shown on parking pages. Parking companies, however, now appear to realize the necessity of working with Google and Yahoo to develop options which allow a domain owner to exclude categories of ads which are shown on parked pages. Based on several conversations with parking companies at the recent T.R.A.F.F.I.C show that keyword category and trademark exclusion will soon be available.

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Q&A: Microsoft's Ballmer on Yahoo and the Future - in 10 years all media delivered via internet (Washington Post)

In an animated discussion with Washington Post editors and reporters yesterday, Microsoft chief executive Steve Ballmer offered his far-ranging views of upcoming changes in technology and the media.

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Games consoles high on energy even when no one plays (New Zealand Herald)

Games consoles such as the Sony Playstation 3 can burn up to five times more energy than a medium sized refrigerator, a Choice study has found.

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Secret ACTA treaty may include ISP filtering (ars technica)

ISP filtering of "pirated" material is a controversial measure that would be tough to push through a national legislature in the US, EU, Japan, Korea, or Canada, what with all those pesky "voters" with their concerns about privacy, fair use, and false positives. But sneaking the provision into a trade agreement? Much easier.

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'No need to panic' over lack of super-fast broadband in the UK (The Independent)

The man appointed to examine why the UK has been left behind many other countries in the roll-out of super-fast broadband believes there is no need for a panic-stricken attempt to catch up.

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Facebook information should be regulated, UK survey says (The Guardian)

Nine out of 10 British people think there should be tighter regulation of information on social networking websites, according to new research.

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