Articles by date

20 May 2009

Brits Focus their Internet Time on a Few Sites (PC Advisor)

The top 10 web brands are getting stronger, despite the proliferation of new sites and services. The 10 Web brands on which Britons spend the most time accounted for nearly half of all U.K. Internet time -- compared to less than 42 percent a year ago.

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Judge Postpones Lori Drew Sentencing, Weighs Dismissal (Wired)

A federal judge on Monday postponed the sentencing of Lori Drew, the 50-year-old woman convicted of unauthorized computer access last year in the country's first federal cyberbullying prosecution.

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Do we want ISPs to penalise music fans? by Billy Bragg (The Guardian)

Having failed miserably in previous attempts to stamp out illicit filesharing, the record industry has now joined forces with other entertainment lobby groups to demand that the government takes action to protect their business model.

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Small company develops new way to stop form spam (Network World)

Spam isn't just a problem for people with e-mail addresses, but also for companies and organizations running Web sites with various types of feedback forms.

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Report: Over 60 Percent of Websites Contain Serious Vulnerabilities (Dark Reading)

Most Websites harbor at least one major vulnerability, and over 80 percent of Websites have had a critical security flaw, according to new data released today by WhiteHat Security.

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Web attack that poisons Google results gets worse (Network World)

A new attack that peppers Google search results with malicious links is spreading quickly, the U.S. Computer Emergence Response Team warned on Monday.

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Please kill this cookie monster to save Europe's websites (OUT-LAW News)

EDITORIAL: Visit any website and there's a good chance that it will send a cookie to your computer. But unless that cookie is essential, its delivery could become illegal under a strange new plan that has, very quietly, won EU support.

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US net pioneer hails Australian govt's 'breathtaking' broadband network (The Australian)

Call him Kevin Rudd's $43billion man. Larry Smarr, a 60-year-old US physicist and one of the pioneers of the internet, says the Rudd Government's announcement last month of a new broadband network is "breathtaking" and puts Australia at the forefront of government policy around the world embracing "intelligent infrastructure", reports The Australian.

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19 May 2009

From 'why?' to 'why not?' The web is the biggest media revolution since the printing press, says Clay Shirky (The Guardian)

The near future of the web is tied up with the logic of present media practice, and the logic of present media practice dates back to Gutenberg's invention of movable type in the mid-1400s. The problem Gutenberg introduced into intellectual life was abundance: once typesetting was perfected, a copy of a book could be created faster than it could be read. Figuring out which books were worth reading, and which weren't, became one of the defining problems of the literate.

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New Mood in Antitrust May Target Google (New York Times)

For decades, the nation's biggest antitrust cases have centered on technology companies. And they have all been efforts by the government to deal with powerful companies with far-reaching influence, like AT&T, the telephone monopoly; I.B.M., the mainframe computer giant; and Microsoft, the powerhouse of personal computer software.

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Google change could stir more advertiser angst (CNET)

Google's love-hate relationship with the advertisers that pay its bills could hit another rocky patch following its latest AdWords policy change.

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Pay Walls Alone Won't Save Newspapers (New York Times)

Will May 2009 mark the beginning of the end for the free, unfettered Internet?

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Mobile phones do not cause stress, study shows (The Age)

The apparent scourge of the 24/7 lifestyle, the mobile phone, keeps users "perpetually available" but does not make people any more rushed or pressured for time, according to a study of more than 1000 workers.

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17 May 2009

Wolfram Alpha: The search is on (The Economist)

It is the curse of every internet search engine to be compared to Google, master of the universe and supreme ruler over two-thirds of such searches. Since newcomers never measure up to the breadth and depth of the billions of pages that Google has indexed over the past decade, most of these comparisons end with an easy win for the incumbent. Pretenders to the throne, nevertheless, keep appearing.

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The Censors Right Here at Home (Newsweek)

Internet censorship used to be pretty easy to spot. When China blocks YouTube or prohibits anything on the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, it's not hard to figure out what's going on. But as governments and commercial firms get savvier about the Internet, censorship is getting more subtle. A slow Web site could be an accidental glitch or something more intentional.

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16 May 2009

@Thinking Digital: Future computer interfaces of today (The Guardian)

The afternoon talks at Thinking Digital began with a YouTube star, Johnny Chung Lee. I along with millions of others have seen Johnny create a multi-touch white board with the WiiMote from the Nintendo Wii. It's a brilliant hack, and he basically showed how almost anyone could create a multi-touch whiteboard for $100 and a weekend of work. It's being used all over the world, especially in places where these boards could be useful but were previously unaffordable.

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Obstacles and Solutions to Internet Jurisdiction: A Comparative Analysis of the EU and US laws by Faye Fangfei Wang (Journal of International Commercial Law and Technology)

Abstract: In an era of information technology, businesses, through the use of the boundless Internet, can enter into international electronic contracts from anywhere in the world. The potential for cross-border disputes in electronic contracts is obviously much greater than in a paper-based environment, where a high degree of commercial contracts are domestic in nature. Can the traditional rules on jurisdiction, which are geographically orientated and generally rely on the place of performance, apply to the modern electronic contract disputes? This paper will analyse the EU and US approaches for determining jurisdiction in e-contracting cases and discuss the possibility of proposing specific jurisdiction rules for online contracts.

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Guatemala police arrest Twitter user for 'inciting financial panic' (The Guardian)

Police in Guatemala have arrested a Twitter user and confiscated his computer for "inciting financial panic" after he urged people to remove funds from a state-owned bank.

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Google blames outage on system error and online traffic jam (Computerworld)

Google Inc. is blaming this morning's Google Apps service outage on a system error that caused a major traffic jam.

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Online Shopping Growth Flattens As Even America's Rich Cut Back (New York Times)

For a little while at the beginning of the year, online shoppers tentatively started filling their virtual shopping carts. But they have cut back once again this spring -- especially the older and wealthier people.

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Hackers attack Facebook users (Reuters)

Hackers launched an attack on Facebook's 200 million users on Thursday, successfully gathering passwords from some of them in the latest campaign to prey on members of the popular social networking site.

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Pirated pop keeps stars popular (BBC News)

File-sharing sites help make popular acts more popular, finds a study. The research, by industry body PRS for Music, showed the most pirated pop songs tend to be those at the top of the music charts.

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Australian man charged over 'anti-Semitic' YouTube video (The Independent)

Police have charged a man who allegedly posted a video on YouTube with inciting racism under a so-far untested Australian state law, officials said today. A newspaper report said the video targeted Jews.

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Hong Kong tech jailed for stealing sex-with-starlet photos (The Age)

A computer technician was jailed for eight and a half months today for stealing photos of a Hong Kong pop star having sex with starlets that would be seen by millions of people via the internet.

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Is the U.S. ready for government-sponsored cyberattacks? (PC World)

If there's a sudden cyberattack on the U.S. Navy, Jim Granger could be among the first to know since it's his job to keep watch.

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