Articles by date

01 November 2009

The power of tweets (The Guardian)

What have Jan Moir, AA Gill and Jimmy Carr got in common? They have all provoked storms of protest on microblogging website Twitter. But is this a new age of democracy, or a danger to free speech?

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American network engineers question need for Net neutrality rules (Computerworld)

New Net neutrality regulations, as proposed by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, don't make sense because some Internet traffic is already prioritized and needs to continue to be, two networking engineers said Thursday.

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In China, Objections to Google's Book Scans (New York Times)

A long-running dispute over Google's efforts to digitize books has spread this month to China, where authors have banded together to demand that their works be protected from what they call unauthorized copying.

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31 October 2009

Celebrating 40 years of the net (BBC News)

It has often been said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. For the internet, that first step was more of a stumble.

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Molly is a teenage girl who likes Hannah Montana, Lily Allen and Pink (or so the covert investigator who plays her would like internet paedophiles to think) (The Independent)

For a middle-aged man, Jonathan Taylor's music and television tastes could be described as peculiar. He spends his spare time watching Hannah Montana and listening to Lily Allen and Pink. For this sacrifice, his three young daughters think him a wonderful father. But, rather like Montana, Mr Taylor is living a double life.

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Egypt launches mobile phone users ethical code of conduct (BBC News)

A code of ethics for the use of mobile phones has been launched by Egypt's official telecoms regulatory body.

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Facebook wins $711m in spam lawsuit (The Guardian)

Facebook has been awarded $711.2m (£429.m) in damages after winning a case against Sanford Wallace, known as "Spamford", who sent mail and made posts without the permission of the social networking website's users.

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France Télécom to invest €1bn to prevent suicides (The Times)

France Télécom is preparing to set aside €1 billion as part of a plan to end a spate of suicides amongst staff by offering older workers the chance to go part time.

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30 October 2009

Facebook calls for feedback on new privacy policy (The Age)

Facebook has outlined changes to its privacy policy and asked for feedback from the social network's more than 300 million users.

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AFACT v iiNet filesharing copyright case decision months away (Computerworld)

The legal stoush between the Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft and ISP, iiNet, resumes on Monday, but the judge's decision is unlikely to come until next year.

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British ISP TalkTalk threatens legal action over Mandelson's filesharing plan (The Guardian)

TalkTalk, the second largest internet service provider in the UK, has threatened to launch legal action if business secretary Peter Mandelson follows through with his plan to cut off persistent illegal filesharers' internet connections.

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Warning over fake 2012 London Olympics websites (BBC News)

Fake websites have been set up claiming to sell tickets for London's 2012 Olympics despite none being available until 2011, a consumer group has found.

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UK data protection laws inadequate - European Commission (Reuters)

The European Commission on Thursday moved a step closer to taking Britain to court for failing to provide its citizens with adequate privacy and personal data protection when using electronic communications.

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29 October 2009

Internet Explorer 6: the browser that won't die (The Guardian)

Internet Explorer 6 is the most popular web browser, according to Net Applications' Market Share website, and it's also the most hated. Its use has been raised in parliamentary questions, and even Microsoft would dearly love to be rid of it. The browser is "insecure", lacking in features, and just too old to observe almost a decade of new web standards. Yet despite internet campaigns against it, such as IE6 No More, the browser launched with Windows XP in 2001 seems likely to continue for a few years yet.

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Facebook project gives world peace a chance (The Guardian)

For many of its 300 million enthusiasts, Facebook is a convenient way to keep in touch with friends, track down old sweethearts and share drunken photographs with the world. But the global power of the social networking site is now being harnessed for a rather more laudable aim: the pursuit of world peace.

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How laptops took over the world (The Guardian)

The rise of portable computing has forced companies to rethink how they let staff work - and is shifting the balance of power in the IT industry

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Business software heads for the clouds as Google beats Microsoft to Los Angeles deal (Los Angeles Times)

Google has won its highest-profile customer in its battle with Microsoft to provide e-mail and other internet services to businesses.

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Editorial: Microchips and Monopolies - Intel and anti-trust complaints (New York Times)

Following a 16-month-long formal investigation, and years of dithering during the Bush administration, the Federal Trade Commission is reportedly within weeks of filing an antitrust complaint against Intel for abusing its dominant position in the microchip market to shut out a smaller rival, Advanced Micro Devices.

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We7 CEO: Lord Mandelson is wrong on internet pirates (The Times)

At this morning's Cabinet Forum conference, Peter Mandelson announced the government's plans to amend UK digital rights management, stating his intention of giving a fairer deal for all.

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Google takes on iTunes with music search (The Times)

The internet search giant will today add relevant music tracks and albums to its US search results, and make them available for purchase

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European Union Plan Could Lead to Lower Cost International Calls (New York Times)

The European Commission will urge the 27 European Union countries Wednesday to reserve a uniform slice of broadcast spectrum for a pan-European mobile broadband network, one that could enable flat-rate, international voice and data calling plans.

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Cybercriminals target Australian networks (ABC News)

More evidence is emerging of sophisticated attacks by criminals and foreign governments on Australia's computer networks.

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Anti-Phishing Working Group Release Phishing Activity Trends Report: The Internet Has Never Been More Dangerous (Anti-Phishing Working Group)

The quarterly APWG Phishing Activity Trends Report analyzes phishing attacks reported to the APWG by its member companies, its Global Research Partners, through the organization's website at www.antiphishing.org and by email submissions to reportphishing@antiphishing.org. APWG also measures the evolution, proliferation and propagation of crimeware drawing from the research of our member companies. In the last half of this report you will find tabulations of crimeware statistics and related analyses.

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From The Pentagon To Monty Python: The Internet Turns 40 (Huffington Post)

Tomorrow is the internet's fortieth birthday. Its creators are even throwing it a birthday party at the University of California, Los Angeles, the origin of the first message ever transmitted over what we know today as "the internet," on October 29, 1969. If you're wondering what the first message ever transmitted was -- the digital age's "Come here, Watson," statement, as it were -- it consisted of two letters: "LO." It was actually supposed to be "LOG," as in "LOG IN," but the receiving computer crashed after receiving just the first two letters -- not a very auspicious beginning, it must be admitted. Still, for poetic reasons, "LO" seems pretty apt: "Lo! The Internet was created!"

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Internet 'a teenager' at 40 (The Independent)

Leonard Kleinrock never imagined Facebook, Twitter, or YouTube that day 40 years ago when his team gave birth to what is now taken for granted as the Internet.

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