Articles by date

02 January 2009

With Gaza conflict, cyberattacks come too (Computerworld)

[IDG] The conflict raging in Gaza between Israel and Palestine has spilled over to the Internet.

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Fury as Mafia godfathers idolised on Facebook (The Times)

To the fury and dismay of relatives of Mafia victims, pages posted on the social networking site Facebook idolising notorious Cosa Nostra Godfathers have generated thousands of supporters in Italy.

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In Several US States, A Push to Stem Cyberbullying (Washington Post)

In California, a hateful Internet campaign followed sixth-grader Olivia Gardner through three schools. In Vermont, a humiliated Ryan Halligan, 13, took his own life after being encouraged to do so by one of his middle-school peers. And in perhaps the most notorious case, Lori Drew, 49, was recently convicted on misdemeanor charges for posing as a teenage boy on MySpace to woo and then reject 13-year-old Megan Meier of Missouri, who later hanged herself in her closet.

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Chinese Court Convicts 11 in Microsoft Piracy Case (New York Times)

A court in southern China convicted 11 people on Wednesday of violating national copyright laws and participating in a sophisticated counterfeiting ring that for years manufactured and distributed pirated Microsoft software throughout the world.

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Web worldwide: UK housewives love it, Chinese use it most, Danes least keen (The Guardian)

... The poll of more than 27,500 people in 16 countries found that housewives in the UK spend 47% of their leisure time on the web, compared with 39% for students and 32% for the unemployed. Globally, the average across all occupations was 29%.

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UK's database plan condemned by Europe (The Independent)

Britain must rethink plans for a database holding details of every email, mobile phone and internet visit, Europe's human rights commissioner has said in an outspoken attack on the growth of surveillance societies. Thomas Hammarberg said that UK proposals for sweeping powers to collect and store data will increase the risk of the "violation of an individual's privacy".

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01 January 2009

Researchers devise undetectable phishing attack (InfoWorld)

[IDG] With the help of about 200 Sony Playstations, an international team of security researchers have devised a way to undermine the algorithms used to protect secure Web sites and launch a nearly undetectable phishing attack.

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Mums furious as Facebook removes breastfeeding photos; Mafia Finds Fans on Facebook (The Guardian)

Facebook has become the target of an 80,000-plus protest by irate mothers after banning breastfeeding photographs from online profiles.

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Hi-tech crime to boom as downturn blooms (BBC)

With the economic downturn affecting every corner of the globe, it is perhaps no surprise that it is likely to affect hi-tech criminals over the next 12 months.

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FCC's Martin Drops Porn Filtering Idea (BusinessWeek)

Even though Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Kevin Martin is leaving in a matter of weeks, he still hopes to push through a major policy decision he's been backing for months: One that would create a nationwide free wireless broadband network for use by all.

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YouTube shoots down Israeli air strike videos (The Age)

[AFP] YouTube censors have removed several videos showing footage of air strikes and other attacks on Hamas militants in the Gaza Strip which were posted by the Israel Defense Forces on its new YouTube channel.

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Writing the Web's Future in Numerous Languages (New York Times)

The next chapter of the World Wide Web will not be written in English alone. Asia already has twice as many Internet users as North America, and by 2012 it will have three times as many. Already, more than half of the search queries on Google come from outside the United States.

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Internet Use Grows at Meetings, as Do Challenges (New York Times)

Until recently, travelers attending conferences or trade shows had simple Internet needs. They would check e-mail messages and maybe look up information on the Web or connect to the home office.

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Private firm may track all British email and calls (The Guardian)

The private sector will be asked to manage and run a communications database that will keep track of everyone's calls, emails, texts and internet use under a key option contained in a consultation paper to be published next month by Jacqui Smith, the home secretary.

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Battle lines drawn over UK Bill to ban 'extreme' porn (The Independent)

To some people it is exactly the kind of protective legislation that Britain needs in a world where access to a vast array of pornography is available at the click of a mouse. To others, a new law banning "extreme" pornography gives the Government unprecedented powers to police bedrooms (and basements).

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31 December 2008

Public Strategies for Internet Co-Regulation in the United States, Europe and China by B. Frydman, L. Hennebel & Gregory Lewkowicz [Governance, Regulations And Powers On The Internet (Social Science Research Network)

Abstract: This paper studies the framework for Internet regulation in the United States, Europe and China. Focusing on co-regulatory mechanisms, it analyses the legal tools used by governments in order to entrust private 'points of control' to monitor Internet. It focuses more specifically on the impact of co-regulation on the rule of law and on the emergence of a transnational struggle for law between global players.

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30 December 2008

Get-Rich Offers Swell on Facebook (Washington Post)

On Facebook, a target-rich environment of the young and potentially real estate-less, D.C. resident Omari West can't help but notice all the advertisements spinning the economy's nose dive into can't-miss opportunities.

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Smartphones drive mobile markets (BBC)

... But all is not rosy in the smartphone garden. The popularity of these devices has brought to light several problems that look set to become acute in 2009.

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How Does So Much Spam Come From One Place? (Washington Post)

At roughly 4:30 p.m. Eastern time last Tuesday, the volume of junk e-mail arriving at inboxes around the world suddenly plummeted by at least 65 percent, an unprecedented drop caused by what is believed to be a single, simple act.

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US cyberbullying laws do little to deter behaviour, experts say (The Guardian)

Legal experts say the long-term impact of cyberbullying laws in America just beginning to take shape

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Why Online Ads Are Weathering the Recession (BusinessWeek)

In most media, 2009 will bring unkind cuts, and Madison Avenue will never be the same. But Internet advertising seems to be holding up

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Online video ads put message into the medium (The Guardian)

Online video technology firm Blinkx has developed an integrated advertising system it hopes will help generate revenues from the growing amount of video on the web.

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29 December 2008

Music companies plan music rival to YouTube (Sunday Times)

Music companies are working on plans to launch their own video site, in direct competition with Google's YouTube. The move comes as Warner Music pulls all its videos from the site after the two firms failed to agree on a new contract.

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UK behind in global rush to broadband (The Observer)

Britain is falling badly behind the rest of the world in the use of broadband technology and the consequences could prove disastrous for education, health care, entertainment and the fight against global warming, one of the country's leading computer experts has warned.

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Alternative health capital turns its 'negative energy' on pioneering wi-fi system (Sunday Telegraph)

It is regarded as an oasis of calm and tranquility, and the nation's capital for alternative health therapies and spiritual healing remedies. But now the residents of Glastonbury, which has long been a favoured destination for pilgrims, are at the centre of a bitter row in which many blame the town's new wireless computer network - known as wi-fi - for a spate of health problems.

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