Articles by date

18 June 2008

Stunts Today for Firefox. Sophisticated Programs Tomorrow (New York Times)

Today marks the official release of the version 3.0 for the Firefox browser. But what does that mean for a product that has been designed, written and tested in public? There's no surprise about what it does; that's been clear for months. And you could get a nearly complete version of the software for the last several weeks.

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Cash in hand: why Africans are banking on the mobile phone - The dramatic spread of the handset is revolutionising the way money circulates (The Guardian)

For consumers in developed markets, using a mobile phone for banking services is a smart add-on to a bank's branch network. But to people in the developing world, the arrival of mobile banking - or m-banking - is potentially revolutionary.

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Mobility key in continent lacking fixed-phone infrastructure (The Guardian)

Africa has become extremely attractive to mobile phone companies because of its sheer potential for growth. As markets in Europe and the US reach saturation point, competition and regulatory pressure has forced prices lower, so some of the world's largest players are looking for new markets in which to expand.

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17 June 2008

Lewis estate takes on 11-year-old in new battle of Narnia.com

A family in Scotland had what they thought was a nice idea - to give their child the domain name of Narnia.mobi as an upcoming surprise. While it was thought to be the perfect birthday present for the 11 year old CS Lewis fan, the family did not reckon on the legal action that may follow.

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Average teenager's iPod has 800 illegal music tracks (The Times)

Teenagers and students have an average of more than 800 illegally copied songs each on their digital music players, the largest academic survey of young people's music ownership has found.

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Tech firms act to counter 'information overload' (The Times)

A new research group will study how firms can reduce the amount of time workers waste reading unnecessary e-mails

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Korea's new generation of 'Web 2.0' protesters (International Herald Tribune)

In June 1987, Seoul's City Hall Plaza reverberated with a chant that signaled the end of military rule in South Korea: "Dokjetado!" or "Down with the dictatorship!" In June this year, the plaza has once again become a rallying point for crowds calling for the removal of an unpopular government: "Out with Lee Myung Bak!"

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Censorship: Record number of bloggers arrested (The Guardian)

Repressive governments are arresting more bloggers than ever as they struggle to cope with the threat posed by the internet, researchers have claimed.

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Death of 13-year-old prompts cyberbullying test case (The Guardian)

A Missouri woman accused of creating a fictitious character on MySpace to cyberbully a 13-year-old neighbour who then committed suicide pleaded not guilty to federal charges at a Los Angeles court yesterday. The case, say lawyers, could radically affect the way millions of users gain access to the internet.

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Malware-Driven Child Porn Raises Red Flag (Dark Reading)

What if you unknowingly harbored child pornography on your work laptop? A child pornography possession charge against a former Massachusetts state government employee has been dropped after forensic evidence showed that his machine was infected with various forms of malware that silently drove his browser to the unsavory sites and files.

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US Federal judge lands in hot water over explicit images on Web site (Computerworld)

In an incident that highlights how almost nothing that one does on the Internet is private, the chief judge of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has recused himself from an obscenity trial after the Los Angeles Times reported last week that it had found a cache of sexually explicit images on his personal Web site.

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au: ISPs: Govt porn filters 'could cripple internet' (ZDNet)

Broadband providers Internode and iiNet have hit out against the Federal government's ISP-level content filtering initiative -- a scheme that could cripple Australia's high-speed internet access, according to one exec.

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MySpace Might Have Friends, but It Wants Ad Money (New York Times)

When the News Corporation added MySpace to its portfolio nearly three years ago, it expected that if its base of 16 million users kept growing -- and each user kept adding friends, sharing photos and swapping flirty messages -- the advertising dollars would roll in.

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Andrew Keen on New Media: Choose your words carefully, the blink media revolution has begun (The Independent)

Blink and you'll miss this message. Brevity is the new digital cool. As handheld computers such as the iPhone and the BlackBerry replace the desktop, mass media is being transformed into micro media. Technology is chunking, slicing and shrinking the message. Welcome to the age of blink media.

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16 June 2008

Internet use doubles in White House race: survey (ABC)

A new study says the internet now plays a central role in US politics, with nearly half of all Americans using the web and other new media to follow the presidential campaign.

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The internet and the 2008 US election (Pew Internet & American Life Project)

Fully 46% of all Americans have used the internet, email or cell phone text messaging to get news about the campaign, share their views and mobilize others. Further, the proportion of Americans going online on a typical day at the tail end of the primary season to get political news or information has more than doubled since a comparable point in the 2004 race -- from 8% of all adults in spring 2004 to 17% of all adults in spring 2008.

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Guiding the Censor's Scissors: Assessing Internet Filtering by Derek Bambauer [Brooklyn Law School] (Social Science Research Network)

Abstract: On-line censorship is on the rise, in democratic states - including the U.S. - as well as authoritarian ones. It is no longer sufficient to employ a country's mode of governance as a proxy for the legitimacy of its Internet restrictions. In addition, attempting to apply one state's normative views regarding on-line content to practices of other states is likely to devolve, unhelpfully, into accusations of cultural colonialism or repression. This Article seeks a new approach to evaluating the legitimacy of Internet filtering by focusing on the process by which censorship decisions are made, the protections available for content owners and users, and the narrowness with which these choices are implemented. It hopes to engage a range of stakeholders - from governments to watchdogs to activists to corporations - in assessing filtering regimes through quantitative metrics, and then to utilize these measurements in both public and private decisionmaking.

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Weak evidence links congressmen's cyberattacks to China, experts say (Computerworld)

U.S. House members who say that China may have been responsible for attacks on their computers have provided little evidence to back up their claims, according to computer security experts.

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Google's Yahoo Rebound Play (BusinessWeek)

With Microsoft out of the picture, Web search king Google strikes a search ad deal with Yahoo. But where does that leave the struggling portal?

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us: Charging by the Byte to Curb Internet Traffic (New York Times)

Some people use the Internet simply to check e-mail and look up phone numbers. Others are online all day, downloading big video and music files. For years, both kinds of Web surfers have paid the same price for access. But now three of the country's largest Internet service providers are threatening to clamp down on their most active subscribers by placing monthly limits on their online activity.

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Yahoo! succumbs to the power of Google (The Observer)

The firm's advertising tie-up wounds Microsoft but hurts its own future too, says John Naughton: Truly, you couldn't make it up - unless perhaps you were a script consultant for a soap opera. Here's the plot line so far: Microsoft, a successful but ageing computer company with a vast deposit account, decides it needs an attractive acquisition to enable it to keep up with the younger - Web 2.0 - generation. So it makes a generous offer to Yahoo!, a fashionable but faltering younger company. But Yahoo! doesn't want to be ravaged by an older corporation and embarks on all kinds of crazy schemes to repulse its offer, including making overtures to Google, the new boy on the block.

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14 June 2008

Mobile internet use 'rocketing in Europe' (Silicon)

Europe has taken to 3G faster than any other region in the world and usage is growing rapidly as networks proliferate, according to research commissioned by mobile operator body the GSM Association (GSMA).

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EU states extend life of Internet security body, ENISA (Reuters)

European Union telecoms ministers agreed on Thursday to extend the life of the bloc's Internet security watchdog by three years as threats to the Web increase.

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US ISPs: We're limiting our own Usenet groups, not blocking others (CNet)

An announcement this week by New York State Attorney General Andrew Cuomo that three Internet service providers would "block" sources of child porn has caused a surprising amount of confusion.

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us: Jail sentence for botnet creator (BBC)

A hacker who hijacked hundreds of PCs to create a botnet has been sentenced to 41 months in jail by a US court.

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