Articles by date

12 September 2014

Wearer be warned: your fitness data may be sold or used against you (The Conversation)

People interested in tracking their health, physical activity levels and body functions can now choose from a plethora of sensor-embedded digital gadgets to monitor and measure their bodies. But the big question for many users is how their personal health and medical data are used.

Read full article

Yahoo wins battle in secretive surveillance court (CNN)

The public will soon get a broader glimpse at the still-secretive world of government data collection. Yahoo said Thursday it won release of 1,500 pages of documents filed in a secretive surveillance court. It said the documents stem from an unsuccessful lawsuit it brought in 2008 challenging the government's right to demand user information.

Read full article

11 September 2014

Netflix leads tech giants' 'go-slow' protest in battle over net neutrality (The Guardian)

Much of the internet went on a "go-slow" protest on Wednesday, as some of the world's largest tech companies began a protest over proposals that could create fast web lanes for some companies.

Read full article

In Games Like Minecraft, Tech Giants See More Than Fun (New York Times)

Parents like Minecraft because it can be a creative outlet for their children. Teachers like the game because it can bring lessons to life. And Microsoft likes the game so much that the tech giant wants to buy Minecraft's parent company for more than $2 billion.

Read full article

With New Apple Products, a Privacy Challenge (New York Times)

No one has considered Apple a serious data company, until now. For years, Apple has offered Internet services like email and online calendars. But Tuesday, with the introduction of health-monitoring technology and a new service that will allow people to buy things wirelessly with some Apple devices, the Cupertino, Calif., company positioned itself as a caretaker of valuable personal information, like credit card numbers and heart rates.

Read full article

Spotify: Aussie Music Piracy Down 20% The Year After Our Launch (TorrentFreak)

New research from Spotify shows that music piracy via BitTorrent dropped 20% in Australia during the first year the streaming platform was operational. The drop was mostly driven by casual file-sharers, and the number of hard-core pirates remains stable.

Read full article

10 September 2014

.LONDON Kicks Off GA in Style

The .london gTLD is well on its way to the top ten new gTLDs when it comes to total registrations, coming in 12th at the end of its first day of General Availability with 35,557.

Read full article

Discussing Online 'Right to Be Forgotten,' Google Takes European Privacy Tour to Spain (New York Times)

As Google seeks expert advice on how to carry out its "right to be forgotten" court order in Europe, the company went to Spain on Tuesday, where the whole thing started.

Read full article

Blocking copyright-infringing websites derided as like 'whacking moles' (The Guardian)

The consumer advocacy group Choice says blocking websites in an attempt to curb copyright infringement would be like "whacking moles".

Read full article

Research Finds No Large Scale Heartbleed Exploit Attempts Before Vulnerability Disclosure (Threat Post)

In the days and weeks following the public disclosure of the OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability in April, security researchers and others wondered aloud whether there were some organizations-perhaps the NSA-that had known about the bug for some time and had been using it for targeted attacks. A definitive answer to that question may never come, but traffic data collected by researchers on several large networks shows no exploit attempts in the months leading up to the public disclosure.

Read full article

A framework for knotty global Internet problems (FCW)

Microsoft is in the midst of a high-stakes battle about the reach of U.S. law enforcement into worldwide data centers. The federal government asserts rights to obtain by legal warrant emails of a Microsoft customer stored in an Irish data center, and so far judges involved in the case have backed the government.

Read full article

New Turkey further tightens Internet control (Hurriyet)

Turkey's 62nd government led by Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu officially took office after it received the vote of confidence from Parliament on Sept. 6. This marked the end of a month-long effort to shape the new political structure following Recep Tayyip Erdoğan's election as Turkey's new president. The ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) concluded what could have been a difficult process for any political party without any major problems, launching a new era as "the making of new Turkey."

Read full article

09 September 2014

Google 'right to be forgotten' ruling enriches PR companies scrubbing the web (The Independent)

The Google "right to be forgotten" ruling is creating a boom time for reputation management PR companies, which are charging clients for having personal information erased from the Internet.

Read full article

'Five Eyes' surveillance pact should be published, Strasbourg court told (The Guardian)

The secret "Five Eyes" treaty that authorises intelligence sharing between the UK, US, Australia, Canada and New Zealand should be published, according to an appeal lodged on Tuesday at the European court of human rights.

Read full article

European commission reopens Google antitrust investigation (The Guardian)

In a surprise move, the European Commission is reopening its four-year antitrust investigation into Google's search and advertising business - and could open a separate one into its Android mobile operating system.

Read full article

Google Is Target of European Backlash on U.S. Tech Dominance (New York Times)

A top German official called for Google to be broken up. A French minister pronounced the company a threat to his country's sovereignty. A European publishing executive likened it to a Wagnerian dragon.

Read full article

Google plans debates across Europe on 'right to be forgotten' (BBC News)

Google is holding seven public meetings across Europe to debate issues raised by the "right to be forgotten" ruling.

Read full article

BBC: ISPs Should Assume Heavy VPN Users are Pirates (TorrentFreak)

In a submission to the Australian Government on the issue of online piracy, the BBC indicates that ISPs should be obliged to monitor their customers' activities. Service providers should become suspicious that customers could be pirating if they use VPN-style services and consume a lot of bandwidth, the BBC says.

Read full article

08 September 2014

Police in Spain Arm Themselves With Social Media to Fight Crime (New York Times)

When a European arrest warrant was issued recently for Brett and Naghemeh King, who took their cancer-stricken child out of a Hampshire hospital in the south of England without permission, the Spanish police did what has become increasingly common in the search for missing or wanted people: They posted an alert on Twitter.

Read full article

Online Privacy: Maybe Not So Unreasonable, After All (New York Times)

Mark Zuckerberg said in 2010 that privacy was no longer a "social norm." But four years later, the pendulum might be ready to swing the other way.

Read full article

European Commission position for Internet Governance Forum 2014 (Europa)

The 2014 Internet Governance Forum (IGF) will take place in Istanbul, Turkey, from 2-5 September. This UN-initiated body is a multi-stakeholder, non-decision making forum of global importance for forward-looking discussions on Internet issues. Ministers and Internet leaders, including Neelie Kroes, will discuss the theme "Connecting Continents for Enhanced Multi-stakeholder Internet Governance".

Read full article

Time to hit downloaders hard, Australian musicians say (Australian Financial Review)

The non-profit organisation that collects and distributes song-writing royalties to over 80,000 musicians throughout Australia and New Zealand has called for stiff penalties for consumers of pirated material online and refuted claims that better availability of content will solve Australia's piracy problems.

Read full article

07 September 2014

Germany’s Googlephobia: Why the online giant has become the country’s bogeyman and why this matters (The Economist)

In its nearly 500-year history, Unter den Linden, Berlin's main boulevard, has seen many political protests. But the one held recently in front of Google's offices in the German capital must be among the most peculiar. Activists demonstrated against iWright, a new software that can supposedly write novels and is supposedly backed by Google. "It's a declaration of war against all authors", an organiser said.

Read full article

The language of the internet of things: More and more devices are becoming connected, but will they speak the same language? (The Economist)

There was a time, not long ago, when access to the internet could be gained only through a computer. Now people can get to it using phones, tablets and some games consoles. Increasingly, other devices are becoming internet-linked too, as connectivity is extended to everyday objects such as televisions, radios, watches and cars.

Read full article

New Zealand's Spark users experience internet meltdown (New Zealand Herald)

A frenzy over fake or leaked nude celebrity photos possibly sparked this weekend's disastrous internet meltdown.

Read full article

Registrar Solutions