Articles by date

26 February 2015

PNG tops porn searches on Google, experts divided over link between pornography and violence (ABC News)

Australia's deeply Christian northern neighbour, Papua New Guinea, is the most pornography-obsessed country in the world, according to Google Trends.

Read full article

Facebook privacy policy slated by Belgian data watchdog (BBC News)

Facebook has been accused of breaking European data-protection laws, in a report written for Belgium's privacy watchdog.

Read full article

Google warns Blogger users over porn (BBC News)

Google has warned users of its Blogger platform that blogs containing sexually explicit images and videos will be made private on 23 March.

Read full article

Tech and Trans Pacific Partnership - Flying in the dark (Business Spectator)

... For the tech industry - and for consumers of content - the TPP concerns relate to the possibility of a dramatic re-write of intellectual property laws being forced under the agreement. Certainly this is the concern that Labor's trade spokesman Penny Wong has been flagging.

Read full article

Google and Apple Fight for the Car Dashboard (New York Times)

When Google hosted a boot camp here this month for its Android operating system, there were some new faces in the room: auto manufacturers.

Read full article

24 February 2015

Australian internet pirates won't be pursued under data retention scheme, says AFP (The Guardian)

Authorities are not interested in using the Abbott government's proposed data retention scheme to go after internet pirates and would be prevented from doing so by the commonwealth ombudsman, the assistant commissioner of the Australian federal police, Tim Morris, has said.

Read full article

Why reading and writing on paper can be better for your brain (The Guardian)

My son is 18 months old, and I've been reading books with him since he was born. I say "reading", but I really mean "looking at" - not to mention grasping, dropping, throwing, cuddling, chewing, and everything else a tiny human being likes to do. Over the last six months, though, he has begun not simply to look but also to recognise a few letters and numbers. He calls a capital Y a "yak" after a picture on the door of his room; a capital H is "hedgehog"; a capital K, "kangaroo"; and so on.

Read full article

Facebook's privacy policy breaches European law, report finds (The Guardian)

A report commissioned by the Belgian privacy commission has found that Facebook is acting in violation of European law, despite updating its privacy policy.

Read full article

Ad-blocking software is 'worse than Superfish' (BBC News)

Researchers have identified a fresh threat to the way consumers interact with websites, this time from software designed to block advertisements.

Read full article

Document Reveals Growth of Cyberwarfare Between the U.S. and Iran (New York Times)

A newly disclosed National Security Agency document illustrates the striking acceleration of the use of cyberweapons by the United States and Iran against each other, both for spying and sabotage, even as Secretary of State John Kerry and his Iranian counterpart met in Geneva to try to break a stalemate in the talks over Iran's disputed nuclear program.

Read full article

Why People Probably Won't Pay to Keep Their Web History Secret (The Atlantic)

AT&T is conducting an experiment in how much money Americans will pay for privacy. If consumers in Kansas are willing to pay an extra $30 per month for super-fast fiber-optic Internet access, the telecom giant won't track their online browsing for targeted ads. It turns out, most people opt for the cheaper service, according to AT&T.

Read full article

Australian data retention laws are deflecting discussion about real issues: barrister (ABC News)

Proposed anti-terrorist data retention laws are driven by "deflection politics", according to South Australia's Council for Civil Liberties (SACCL).

Read full article

22 February 2015

Cyber-security: The Kaspersky equation: A Russian antivirus firm impresses the sceptics, again (The Economist)

There is more than one reason to harbour doubts about Eugene Kaspersky and the computer-security company that bears his name. He graduated from an institute close to the KGB and later worked for the Red Army. He has called Edward Snowden, the whistle-blower, a "traitor" for having broken his contract with his former employer, America's National Security Agency (NSA). And, like many an executive in his industry, his regular warnings about big, emerging cyber-threats just happen to be good for drumming up business.

Read full article

Chip Maker to Investigate Claims of Hacking by N.S.A. and British Spy Agencies (New York Times)

Gemalto, a French-Dutch digital security company, said on Friday that it was investigating a possible hacking by United States and British intelligence agencies that may have given them access to worldwide mobile phone communications.

Read full article

21 February 2015

Avoiding a 'digital dark age': future-proofing our existence (ABC News)

The notion that dark clouds are forming over the future of our digital existence has been most recently voiced by an executive of a major multinational internet corporation.

Read full article

20 February 2015

Mark Zuckerberg Q&A: The Full Interview on Connecting the World (Bloomberg)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has a big, expensive goal: to connect the world to the Internet. He spoke with Emily Chang about his plans, after returning from a trip through Southeast Asia and India last year as part of his Internet.org initiative. The interview airs Feb. 19 on Bloomberg Television's Studio 1.0. The transcript below has been lightly edited.

Read full article

Oscars nominees see online piracy surge (BBC News)

American Sniper would win best picture and Birdman's Alejandro Inarritu best director if the Oscars were determined by online piracy rates, a study says.

Read full article

'Revenge porn' mogul Hunter Moore pleads guilty (BBC News)

The man behind a "revenge porn" website has pleaded guilty to hacking and identity theft, in Los Angeles.

Read full article

How Google determined our right to be forgotten (The Guardian)

Mario Costeja González spent five years fighting to have 18 words delisted from Google search results on his name.

Read full article

Google Opposes Proposal to Ease Warrants for Computer Searches (Wall Street Journal)

Google is opposing a proposal that would make it easier for law enforcement to get warrants to hack into computers, the latest skirmish between Silicon Valley and the U.S. government in the wake of Edward Snowden's revelations about widespread spying.

Read full article

Australian govt launches $18m social media monitoring project (Computerworld)

Attorney-General George Brandis this morning announced the government would spend $18 million on a program to monitor and censor "the lies and propaganda terrorist groups are promulgating online to gain support and sympathy from vulnerable young Australians".

Read full article

Australia ranked 20 on OECD fixed broadband rankings; New Zealand tops fibre broadband (Computerworld)

Australia continues to lag behind many other developed nations on fixed broadband subscriptions while excelling in wireless broadband, according to world rankings released by the OECD.

Read full article

19 February 2015

How law enforcement monitors the Dark Web (IT World)

The Dark Web is something that most users might not be familiar with in their day to day use of the Internet. But law enforcement is certainly aware of it, and they are beginning to keep tabs on it in a number of different ways.

Read full article

Yandez asks Russia to open an antitrust probe against Google (Wall Street Journal)

Russia's most popular search engine Yandex says it has asked the state antimonopoly watchdog to investigate Google for possibly violating Russian antitrust law.

Read full article

Google warns of US government 'hacking any facility' in the world (The Guardian)

Google is boldly opposing an attempt by the US Justice Department to expand federal powers to search and seize digital data, warning that the changes would open the door to US "government hacking of any facility" in the world.

Read full article

Registrar Solutions