Articles by date

03 November 2006

U.N. debate swirls around domain name power (CNet)

Call it the Iran and Syria problem. In theory, the Bush administration could order that the domain names of allegedly hostile or terrorist-friendly nations be deleted from the Internet--a unique authority that troubles many developing nations and became a source of contention at the IGF.

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Web inventor fears for the future (BBC)

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the British developer of the world wide web, says he is worried about the way it could be used to spread "misinformation and "undemocratic forces".

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United Nations Internet forum goes titsup (The Register)

The website of the IGF has been suspended (or had been at the time of writing of this article) and replaced with a cartoon dog pulling wires out of a PC. The site at igf2006.info was taken down with 20 minutes left of the main speaking session after the hosts complained that demand from a collaborative website set up to elicit views from the wider Internet was overwhelming its server. It also brought down the main information site at intgovforum.org which was held on the same server.

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Internet milestone: 100 million websites (Sydney Morning Herald)

The first website went online in August 1991 and, now 15 years later, the 100-million website mark has been cracked.

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02 November 2006

The End User: Content vs. control (International Herald Tribune)

Never mind who controls the Internet and whether the U.S. government has undue influence over domain names and root servers. If the question of control is about content, then the United States has a lock on the World Wide Web that looks unshakable. Of the top 30 most-visited Web sites, Asia is home to four and Europe has one, according to September statistics from comScore Networks, a U.S.-based market researcher. (And even the single European name, Lycos, has mixed U.S. parentage.)

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Internet bill of rights proposed (BBC)

A bill of rights for the internet age has been proposed at the IGF. The bill would update and restate rights that have been enshrined for centuries, said Robin Gross of civil liberties group IP Justice.

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Tough talk on net language issue (BBC)

More than 90% of the world's 6,000 languages are not represented on the internet. So what must be done to make the internet a truly global place?

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Kazaa settles 3rd suit on file-sharing (International Herald Tribune)

Kazaa, the file-sharing network, has reached a tentative settlement in the last of three major lawsuits brought against it by the music and motion picture industries.

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'Next step' in science studies: The Web (International Herald Tribune)

In little more than a decade, the Internet has grown to become such a pervasive force in commerce and culture that a group of leading university researchers is trying to make the Web a field of study on its own.

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ICANN warns mistake on non-English Web addresses could 'permanently break Internet' (The Age/AP)

ICANN warned that a mistake in a creating more Web addresses using non-Latin letters could "permanently break the Internet."

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IGF produces anti-spam plan (The Register)

Six of the world's largest anti-spam organisations have set up a new website aimed at killing the online menace. Timed to coincide with an anti-spam workshop at the IGF, the OECD has started StopSpamAlliance.org, along with Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC), the EU Contact Network for Spam enforcement Authorities (CNSA), the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the London Action Plan for Spam Enforcement (LAP), and the Seoul-Melbourne MoU.

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New Internet Governance Proposal Would Trim US Role, Boost Private Sector (IP-Watch)

Becky Burr and Marilyn Cade have issued an updated proposal aimed at defusing the biggest policy tensions by moving governance to the private sector and increasing international involvement. The proposal calls on the US government to initiate several steps to respond to international concern about its unique authority over the authoritative root. The steps include clarifying that the appropriate role of government is limited to serving as the "backstop" for threats to the stability and security of the Internet, identification of changes to the underlying Internet structure that do not threaten the Internet's security or stability, development of a new intergovernmental working group with regional representation to review changes to the Internet structure that create serious stability concerns, and calling upon ICANN to become more transparent and accountable.

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The internet's future is out of this world by Vint Cerf (ZDNet)

In 2006 most people in the developed world would find it hard to imagine life without the internet; never before has a single technology become so central to our lives so quickly. Email, search, e-commerce, social networking sites -- hundreds of millions of people use them every day. But the original internet was a very different world. Designed in 1973, the idea was to enable the US Defence Department to integrate computers into its command and control system. Of course, it was also immediately adopted by its academic developers for their own uses!

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Microsoft files a slew of counterfeiting suits (International Herald Tribune)

Microsoft said it had filed more than 50 lawsuits against individuals and companies worldwide, claiming that they had sold counterfeit copies of its programs using online auction sites, including eBay.

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Regulation for gaming on the Web (International Herald Tribune)

British officials called for international coordination to regulate online gambling as policy makers and investors scramble to salvage high-stakes bets on the industry in the wake of an effective U.S. ban on the business.

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International bodies unite to fight spam (iTWire)

Six leading international anti-spam initiatives have launched, at the first meeting of the IGF in Athens, a new online information resource (www.StopSpamAlliance.org) to assist in fighting spam.

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To the Media, YouTube Is a Threat and a Tool (Washington Post)

Media companies are of two minds about Internet video-sharing site YouTube. They are unsure of whether YouTube is a friend or a foe -- a threat that could siphon off their TV audiences and ad dollars or a powerful promotion machine that could generate buzz for the shows.

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In Teens' Web World, MySpace Is So Last Year (Washington Post)

Teen Web sensation MySpace became so big so fast, News Corp. spent $580 million last year to buy it. Then Google Inc. struck a $900 million deal, primarily to advertise with it. But now Jackie Birnbaum and her fellow English classmates at Falls Church High School say they're over MySpace.

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China: We don't censor the Internet. Really (ZDNet)

While many countries block off some Web sites, China has long drawn heightened scrutiny because of the breadth and sophistication of its Internet censorship.

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EC: Web 2.0 means power and responsibility (ZDNet)

The move towards Web 2.0 will stir the debate over internet governance and make businesses and individuals more powerful and responsible web users, Viviane Reding, European Commissioner for Information Society and Media, has told the IGF.

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Moderation, frustration, and making people uncomfortable - An internet conference with no internet (The Register)

You reach a certain level of frustration and then, suddenly, you relax. The struggle becomes impossible and then you realise that, ultimately, it's not that important. You're still breathing air, you still have legs, this will come to an end. What on earth am I talking about? The mild insanity of hosting a global, revolutionary internet conference and then failing to allow anyone to actually access it - the internet, that is.

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Domain resale market a 'haven' for phishers (The Register)

Domain names likely to appeal to fraudsters are up for grabs on domain resale sites. Firms such as Sedo and Moniker specialise in the sale of domain names that have already been registered and are now being resold in the secondary (or aftermarket) for domain names. Most domain names are sold for a few hundred or thousand dollars (as opposed to an original registration price of $10 or so) while particularly attractive domains - such as hell.com - can fetch six figure sums.

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bh: Websites clamp in Bahrain (Gulf Daily News)

Prosecutors yesterday launched an investigation into complaints by the Information Ministry that various websites are violating Bahrain's laws. A number of complaints have been received from the ministry that Bahraini and non-Bahraini websites violate the Press, printing and publishing law, said a Public Prosecution statement.

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us: IP Address-Level Security a Growing Concern (Enterprise Networks & Servers)

Earlier this year, the FBI published statistics on computer crime that indicated it was costing U.S. businesses $678 billion per year. The average company cost when you do the math is $24,000 in hard dollar losses.

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01 November 2006

Firms defend dealings with China (BBC)

The work of firms such as Microsoft and Cisco was the centre of a debate about openness at the IGF in Athens.

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