Research

19 November 2012

Empirical Study of Privacy Issues among Social Networking Sites by Joanne Kuzma Journal of International Commercial Law and Technology

Abstract: Social media networks are increasing their types of services and the numbers of users are rapidly growing. However, online consumers have expressed concerns about their personal privacy protection and recent news articles have shown many privacy breaches and unannounced changes to privacy policies.

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11 November 2012

Building a Better Internet in Latin America and the Caribbean http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MIC.2011.33

From the beginning, a key element of the Internet's success has been collaboration between its engineers, researchers, network operators, vendors, and service providers.

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09 November 2012

It's a Mad, Mad Internet: Globalisation and the Challenges Presented by Internet Censorship by Jessica E. Bauml Federal Communications Law Journal

The advent of the Internet has brought tremendous technological advancements and growth to the world. However, it has also become a source of conflict, particularly when different countries attempt to regulate this very ubiquitous and amorphous medium. The most notable controversy has arisen in China -- home to the world's most advanced system of Internet censorship, which levies harsh penalties on those who violate the country's strict censorship laws.

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03 November 2012

Internet traffic exchange: 2 billion users and it's done on a handshake by Rudolf Van der Berg of the OECD's Science, Technology and Industry Directorate OECD

Every day one Exabyte of data is said to travel over the Internet - enough data to fill 300,000 of the world's biggest hard disks or 212 million DVDs. And astonishingly, according to Internet Traffic Exchange: Market Developments and Policy Challenges a new OECD report on Internet traffic exchange, most of the thousands of networks that exchange this traffic do so without a written contract or formal agreement.

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21 October 2012

The Right to Be Forgotten? by Conrad Coutinho Columbia Science and Technology Law Review

Have you ever Googled your own name? Statistics say that you probably have. Egotism aside, in a world where potential employers, schools and even romantic partners are likely to Google you, it would be irresponsible not to be aware of what pops up when you search your name. Many experts (and this non-expert) even recommend setting up a Google alert in your name.

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14 October 2012

Fixed and Mobile Networks: Substitution, Complementarity and Convergence OECD

This report examines the convergence of fixed and mobile (wireless) networks and services. It considers these developments against a long standing question of whether they are complementary or competitive. The report concludes that they are both. Mobile providers have garnered a very large share of traditional services, such as telephony, over the past decade.

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11 October 2012

Don't Be Evil: The Fourth Amendment in the Age of Google, National Security, and Digital Papers and Effects Albany Law Journal

Abstract: This Article offers an overview of current Fourth Amendment law in light of evolving concepts of papers and effects, expectations of privacy online, and the third party and state action doctrines. Scholars have addressed some of these issues individually, but this Article analyzes the legal issues that subsist in the wake of the NSA Terrorist Surveillance Program dilemma and during Congress' current push to update the Electronic Communications Privacy Act.

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08 October 2012

Personal Jurisdiction, Internet Commerce and Privacy: The Pervasive Legal Consequences of Modern Geolocation Technologies Albany Law Journal

Abstract: Modern geolocation technologies allow Internet sites to automatically and accurately identify a user's geographic location. This capability -- unavailable just a few years ago -- has begun to revolutionize Internet commerce and communication by enabling content localization, customization, and access regulation on a scale previously thought to be impossible. Yet thus far, the law has reacted inadequately to these technologies, or in some cases, failed to react at all.

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01 October 2012

Freedom of Expression on the Internet: Study of Legal Provisions and Practices Related to Freedom of Expression, the Free Flow of Information and Media Pluralism on the Internet in OSCE Participating States by Yaman Akdeniz [Report of the OSCE Represen... Social Science Research Network

Abstract: Based on the limited effectiveness of state laws and lack of harmonization at international level (despite some efforts at regional level) a number of states, including some in the OSCE region, introduced policies to block access to Internet content, websites deemed illegal, and Web 2.0 based social media platforms which are outside their jurisdiction. In short, the new trend in Internet regulation seems to entail blocking access to content if state authorities are not in a position to reach the perpetrators for prosecution or if their request for removal or take down of such content is rejected or ignored by foreign law enforcement authorities or hosting and content providers.

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27 September 2012

The French Revolution 2.0: Copyright and the Three Strikes Policy by Eldar Haber Harvard Journal of Sports & Entertainment Law

Abstract: Internet file-sharing of copyrighted materials created a struggle between right holders, Internet Service Providers (ISPs), and file-sharers. After several different attempts to resolve the struggle, many countries began to debate the possibility of a Three Strikes Policy (3SP), which includes, inter alia, providing for the termination of subscriptions and accounts of repeat infringers in appropriate circumstances. This policy has thus far been implemented by way of legislation in Taiwan (2009), South Korea (2009), France (2010), the United Kingdom (2010) and New Zealand (2011), and by means of private ordering in Ireland (2010). It is still under consideration elsewhere. The 3SP is portrayed as a panacea for Internet-related infringements.

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24 September 2012

A Prehistory of Internet Governance by Malte Ziewitz & Ian Brown [Research Handbook on Governance of the Internet] Social Science Research Network

Abstract: What social, technical, economic and political developments played a role in constituting a field, in which the idea of 'Internet Governance' could thrive? What are the events, stories and ideas that preceded and made possible today's discussions about governance on, of and through the Internet?

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16 September 2012

Broadband Infrastructure and Economic Growth by Nina Czernich, Oliver Falck, Tobias Kretschmer & Ludger Woessmann [Economic Journal] Social Science Research Network

Abstract: We estimate the effect of broadband infrastructure, which enables high-speed internet, on economic growth in the panel of OECD countries in 19962007. Our instrumental variable model derives its non-linear first stage from a logistic diffusion model where pre-existing voice telephony and cable TV networks predict maximum broadband penetration.

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13 September 2012

Regulation and Control of Communication: The French Online Copyright Infringement Law (HADOPI) by Nicola Lucchi [Cardozo Journal of International and Comparative Law / Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property & Competition Law Research Paper] Social Science Research Network

Abstract: In January 2010, after a troubled process, the French law for "creation and Internet", commonly known as Hadopi, was finally adopted in an amended form. The enacted text was the result of corrective action undertaken by the Conseil constitutionnel (France's highest constitutional authority), through Decision No. 2009-580 DC of the 10th of June 2009.

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09 September 2012

Seized Sites: The In Rem Forfeiture of Copyright-Infringing Domain Names by Andrew Sellars Social Science Research Network

Abstract: In the summer of 2010, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Division of the Department of Homeland Security began "Operation In Our Sites," an enforcement sweep targeted towards websites allegedly dealing in counterfeit goods and copyright-infringing files. The operation targeted the websites by proceeding in rem against their respective domain names. For websites targeted for copyright infringement, ICE Agents used recently-expanded copyright forfeiture remedies passed under the 2008 PRO-IP Act, providing no adversarial hearing prior to the websites being removed, and only a probable cause standard of proof.

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27 August 2012

Don't Be Evil: The Fourth Amendment in the Age of Google, National Security, and Digital Papers and Effects by Andrew William Bagley Albany Law Journal

Abstract: This Article offers an overview of current Fourth Amendment law in light of evolving concepts of papers and effects, expectations of privacy online, and the third party and state action doctrines. Scholars have addressed some of these issues individually, but this Article analyzes the legal issues that subsist in the wake of the NSA Terrorist Surveillance Program dilemma and during Congress' current push to update the Electronic Communications Privacy Act.

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23 August 2012

Personal Jurisdiction, Internet Commerce and Privacy: The Pervasive Legal Consequences of Modern Geolocation Technologies by Kevin F. King Albany Law Journal

Abstract: Modern geolocation technologies allow Internet sites to automatically and accurately identify a user's geographic location. This capability -- unavailable just a few years ago -- has begun to revolutionize Internet commerce and communication by enabling content localization, customization, and access regulation on a scale previously thought to be impossible. Yet thus far, the law has reacted inadequately to these technologies, or in some cases, failed to react at all.

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12 August 2012

Social Media in the Changing Ecology of News Production and Consumption: The Case in Britain by Nic Newman, William H. Dutton & Grant Blank Social Science Research Network

Abstract: This paper looks at how the production and consumption of news is changing in the UK. It draws from survey research of individuals in Britain from 2003-2011, which includes evidence on patterns of news readership among Internet users and non-users, as well as more qualitative case studies of developments in online news organizations, based on interviews and log files of journalistic sites. Survey evidence has shown a step-jump in the use of online news since 2003, as a complement to print news reading, but a leveling off since 2009. However, this relative stability in news consumption masks a change in the growing role of social networks, both as a substitute for search in many cases, but also in their relationship with online newspapers, as the interaction of mainstream news and networked individuals has begun to reshape the ecology of production and consumption.

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05 August 2012

Loving the Cyber Bomb? The Dangers of Threat Inflation in Cybersecurity Policy by Jerry Brito & Tate Watkins Social Science Research Network

Abstract: Over the past two years there has been a steady drumbeat of alarmist rhetoric coming out of Washington about potential catastrophic cyber threats. For example, at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing last year, Chairman Carl Levin said that "cyberweapons and cyberattacks potentially can be devastating, approaching weapons of mass destruction in their effects." Proposed responses include increased federal spending on cybersecurity and the regulation of private network security practices.

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30 July 2012

Net Neutrality 101 by Richard French [University of Ottawa Law & Technology Journal] Social Science Research Network

Abstract: Network neutrality is a controversy of American origin, which, given the American foundations of the internet, has spread to a number of other jurisdictions, including Canada. In this article, I attempt to provide an introduction to the issues in a Canadian context for the non-specialist. Network neutrality is a debate about the public interests in freedom of expression, consumer protection, and economic growth and innovation, as they are mediated by the expansion of broadband internet access.

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08 July 2012

Why Monitor Violent Websites? A Justification by Raphael Cohen-Almagor & Sharon Haleva-Amir [Beijing Law Journal] Social Science Research Network

Abstract: The authors argue that the international community should continue working together to devise rules for monitoring specific Internet sites, as human lives are at stake. Preemptive measures could prevent the translation of murderous thoughts into murderous actions.

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16 June 2012

It’s a Mad, Mad Internet: Globalization and the Challenges Presented by Internet Censorship by Jessica E. Bauml Federal Communications Law Journal

The advent of the Internet has brought tremendous technological advancements and growth to the world. However, it has also become a source of conflict, particularly when different countries attempt to regulate this very ubiquitous and amorphous medium. The most notable controversy has arisen in China -- home to the world's most advanced system of Internet censorship, which levies harsh penalties on those who violate the country's strict censorship laws. China's "Great Firewall" has raised many eyebrows and is garnishing substantial criticism in response to the human rights abuses that result from the jailing and reported torture of Chinese dissidents.

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11 June 2012

A Constitutional Solution for Internet Governance by Rolf H. Weber, R. Shawn Gunnarson & Kirton McConkie [Columbia Science and Technology Law Review] Social Science Research Network

Abstract: Internet governance has long been troubled by an unresolved problem. Its dominant organization, ICANN, suffers from inadequate accountability. ICANN holds the exclusive authority to manage the Domain Name System ("DNS") that enables the Internet to function as a global network, and that authority is exercised by a Board of Directors whose powers are virtually unconstrained. ICANN's exercise of unconstrained power over the Internet DNS is associated with a conspicuous gap between the accountability ICANN needs and the accountability it delivers. ICANN needs sufficient accountability, at least, to honor its written commitments and to satisfy its stakeholders' expectations. Unfortunately, ICANN's performance falls short in both regards.

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08 June 2012

The ITU Treaty Negotiations: A Call for Openness and Participation by Patrick S. Ryan & Jacob Glick [NANOG 55th Meeting] Social Science Research Network

Abstract: The International Telecommunications Union is renegotiating its treaty with the 193 countries of the world, and it hopes to expand from the telecommunications arena into the Internet.

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04 June 2012

The Changing Patterns of Internet Usage by Christopher S. Yoo Federal Communications Law Journal

Abstract: The Internet unquestionably represents one of the most important technological developments in recent history. It has revolutionized the way people communicate with one another and obtain information and created an unimaginable variety of commercial and leisure activities. Interestingly, many members of the engineering community often observe that the current network is ill-suited to handle the demands that end users are placing on it. Indeed, engineering researchers often describe the network as ossified and impervious to significant architectural change. As a result, both the U.S. and the European Commission are sponsoring "clean slate" projects to study how the Internet might be designed differently if it were designed from scratch today.

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21 May 2012

Tweeting about TV: Sharing television viewing experiences via social media message streams by D. Yvette Wohn, Eun-Kyung Na First Monday

Abstract: Through content analysis of messages posted on Twitter, we categorize the types of content into a matrix -- attention, emotion, information, and opinion. We use this matrix to analyze televised political and entertainment programs, finding that different types of messages are salient for different types of programs, and that the frequencies of the types correspond with program content.

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