Internet Use/New Technologies

31 March 2008

Mobile phones 'more dangerous than smoking' Independent on Sunday

Mobile phones could kill far more people than smoking or asbestos, a study by an award-winning cancer expert has concluded. He says people should avoid using them wherever possible and that governments and the mobile phone industry must take "immediate steps" to reduce exposure to their radiation.

Read full article

30 March 2008

Google suffers from weak growth in ad clicks The Guardian

Google has suffered a second consecutive month of weak growth in advertising clicks, fuelling concern that the high-flying internet search specialist is suffering in the economic slowdown. Statistics compiled by the research firm Comscore showed a 3% year-on-year rise during February in the company's "paid clicks" -- the number of times users hit Google's advertising links.

Read full article

Cuba lifts mobile phone restrictions The Guardian

The Cuban president, Raúl Castro, today lifted restrictions on ownership of mobile phones. Castro's move was another indication that he is prepared to grant more freedom to the island's residents. The right to own mobile phones had been restricted to the employees of foreign firms or those holding key posts in the communist-run state.

Read full article

28 March 2008

us: Finding Political News Online, the Young Pass It On New York Times

Senator Barack Obama's videotaped response to President Bush's final State of the Union address -- almost five minutes of Mr. Obama's talking directly to the camera -- elicited little attention from newspaper and television reporters in January. But on the medium it was made for, the Internet, the video caught fire. Quickly after it was posted on YouTube, it appeared on the video-sharing site's most popular list and Google's most blogged list. It has been viewed more than 1.3 million times, been linked by more than 500 blogs and distributed widely on social networking sites like Facebook.

Read full article

Cashing In on MeCommerce E-Commerce Times

... The current social network revenue model relies heavily on targeting consumers via online advertising, hoping the ad reaches the best demographic possible to influence their buying decisions. This approach is outdated and has proven unsuccessful. Business owners and advertisers are finding it harder to segment audiences into distinct demographics.

Read full article

Malaysian Leader Regrets Ignoring Web Sydney Morning Herald

Malaysia's prime minister has said his ruling coalition made a blunder by underestimating the power of the Internet, which the opposition used extensively to win a record number of seats in recent elections.

Read full article

Femotocells solving poor indoor mobile phone coverage The Guardian

What would you say to having a mobile phone mast inside your house? Mobile phone companies think that a lot of us will say yes and, starting from the end of this year, plan to offer us just this in the form of devices called "femtocells".

Read full article

Approval for mobiles on aircraft by Ofcom in Europe BBC

The use of mobiles on planes flying in European airspace has been given approval by UK regulator Ofcom. It has issued plans that will allow airlines to offer mobile services on UK-registered aircraft.

Read full article

Why did Apple try to push its browser onto Windows PCs? The Guardian

Because it wants more people to use it - but the method it used to try to get its Safari browser onto Windows users' machines (pre-selected as part of a "Software Update" to iTunes and QuickTime) was, at best, cackhanded; at worst, downright sneaky.

Read full article

Why WiMax Forbes

WiMax may be a wonky technology. But the pitch for the long-range wireless standard for pumping zillion bits of data through the air is seductive. Imagine being able to access voice, data and video services from any digital device as simply as if you were logging on to the Web with your laptop via the wi-fi connection at the local Starbucks.

Read full article

Aussies go for mobile lifestyle / Asia/Pacific Mobile Phone Market to Surpass 400 Million Units in 2008 Australian IT

More than 9 million mobile devices were shipped to Australia last year, including 3.55 million in the last three months of the year, pushing to the highest quarter on record says IDC. Meanwhile, the latest IDC Asia/Pacific Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker says mobile phone shipments in the Asia/Pacific excluding Japan region in 2007 hit 366 million units, an 18% increase from 2006. Shipments are further projected to exceed 400 million units in 2008, representing a 10% year-on-year increase.

Read full article

27 March 2008

Yahoo Is Joining an Alliance That Has Google as Leader New York Times

Yahoo said Tuesday that it would joining an alliance to be led by Google, its principal rival, that will try to make it easier for programmers to write software that can run on the pages of many social networks and other Web sites. Google announced on Tuesday that it would give up control of the alliance and turn it over to a nonprofit foundation. Google, Yahoo and MySpace, another member of the group, will be among founding members of the group, the OpenSocial Foundation.

Read full article

Bhutan, World's Newest Democracy, Gets Advanced Internet, Mobile Phone Deployments Information Week

Democracy -- as well as state-of-the-art Internet and cell phone service -- are arriving more or less simultaneously this week to the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan. The big question now is how they will impact the tiny kingdom's cherished state of Gross National Happiness.

Read full article

Is cloud computing more than just smoke? CNet

The growing buzz around cloud computing sounds eerily familiar to the utility computing noise of a few years ago. But there is a difference--or at least people in the business swear there is.

Read full article

26 March 2008

UK plea to ban employers trawling Facebook The Times

A powerful coalition of children's charities is urging ministers to make it illegal for companies to trawl Facebook and other social networking websites for information on prospective recruits.

Read full article

Warning to UK parents over children 'being raised online' The Guardian

British children are spending more than 20 hours a week online, most of it at social networking sites such as MySpace, Facebook and Bebo, and are in effect being "raised online", according to research from the Institute for Public Policy Research.

Read full article

Latin America's ECommerce Leader Forbes

There is a market of 500 million people--about 8.6% of the world's population--that the business media all too often neglects as it serves up story after story about China and India. That would be Latin America. Between 2000 and 2007, the number of Internet users in Latin America grew from 18.1 million to 122.4 million, a compounded annual growth rate of 32% compared with only 12% in North America during the same period.

Read full article

Google outlines proposal for 'Wi-Fi on steroids' CNet

Google on Monday said it has a plan to have American consumers from Manhattan to rural North Dakota surfing the Web on handheld gadgets at gigabits-per-second speeds by the 2009 holiday season.

Read full article

au: Phone manufacturers' features a turn-off Australian IT

Mobile phones keep adding whiz-bang features, but research released this week suggests fewer people than makers would like are bothering to use them.

Read full article

For the young, TV's passivity is passé next to the Internet ars technica

A study conducted by Grunwald Associates on kids' use of social networks found 64 percent of people between the ages of 9 and 17 aren't just glued to the couch while the TV is on -- they're going online at the same time. In fact, the TV is what's driving them to go online while watching their favorite shows, sometimes by offering interactive activities to go along with what they're watching.

Read full article

25 March 2008

Internet jewellers - A boy's best friend: Gentlemen prefer buying diamonds online The Economist

"Men are intimidated when they go into a jewellery store to buy their first diamond," says Diane Irvine, the chief executive of Blue Nile. Creating a website that looks good and makes it easy for men to learn about diamonds before buying has turned Blue Nile into the leading online seller of jewellery, confounding predictions that luxury and e-commerce would never mix. With revenues of $319m in 2007, 70% of which is from sales of engagement rings, it is now the biggest online specialist jeweller, and has a 4% share of the engagement-ring market in America. It is also gaining sales in Britain and Canada, where it has operated for a few years, and last month it opened in 12 new countries including Singapore and Japan.

Read full article

Online social networks: Everywhere and nowhere The Economist

A large but long-in-the-tooth technology company hoping to become a bigger force in online advertising buys a small start-up in a sector that everybody agrees is the next big thing. A decade ago, this was Microsoft buying Hotmail -- the firm that established web-based e-mail as a must-have service for internet users, and promised to drive up page views, and thus advertising inventory, on the software giant's websites. This month it was AOL, a struggling web portal that is part of Time Warner, an old-media giant, buying Bebo, a small but up-and-coming online social network, for $850m.

Read full article

Internet communities: Break down these walls The Economist

"The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see." Apply Winston Churchill's aphorism to the internet, and about the farthest back you can look is 1994, when the previously obscure computer network first became known to a wider public. Many people first ventured onto the internet from AOL, CompuServe and Prodigy, which were subscription-based online services that offered e-mail, chatrooms, discussion boards and so on. Having provided their users with access to the internet, however, these venerable digital communities were undermined by it.

Read full article

It's Too Darn Hot: The huge cost of powering-and cooling-data centers has the tech industry scrambling for energy efficiency Business Week

A 35-minute drive south of Iceland's capital of Reykjavik lies the tiny fishing village of Grindavik. One January day, Kristinn Haflioason steers his car a few minutes out of town to a vast, snow-swept expanse of volcanic rock that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean. He climbs out and launches into an unlikely sales pitch that he hopes will persuade corporations from the U.S. and Europe to locate operations there. "Dozens of companies have expressed interest," he says.

Read full article

Andrew Keen on New Media: Has the prophet Steve Jobs found the secret of our digital futures? The Independent

... The most lucid explanation of life after TV I've ever heard came from a nine-year-old. "After TV," the boy said, "comes bedtime." You may laugh, but life after television may well mean bedtime for the careers of many TV executives. And that's why there is such a frenzied rush to create product that will become the standard - the platform, if you like - for the post-television age. This is the new new-media gold rush. Everyone - from Apple's Steve Jobs to News Corp's Rupert Murdoch to NBC's Jeff Zucker to the BBC's Mark Thompson - is scrambling to ascend this summit first and get their hands on the digital holy grail.

Read full article

Registrar Solutions