Pew Study: Liberals More Likely To Block Online Friends Over Political Disagreements

Posted in: Internet Use/New Technologies at 13/03/2012 15:55

People with liberal views are almost twice as likely as conservatives to unfriend someone on social media over political disagreements, according to a new Pew Research survey.

In every category, people who identified as liberal were more likely to shun their connections over political disagreements. Twenty-eight percent of liberal users have unfriended or blocked someone, while 16 percent of conservatives and 14 percent of moderates admitted to doing the same.
http://techdailydose.nationaljournal.com/2012/03/study-liberals-more-likely-to.php

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Social networking sites and politics

Overview

It turns out that birds of a feather don't always flock together on social networking sites when it comes to politics. There is evidence in a new survey by the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project that on social networking sites (SNS):

  • Friends disagree with friends about political issues and usually let their disagreements pass without comment. Among the SNS users whose friends post political content, 25% always agree or mostly agree with their friends' political postings; 73% of these SNS users "only sometimes" agree or never agree with their friends' political postings. When they disagree with others' posts, 66% of these SNS users say they usually ignore the posts; 28% said they usually respond with comments or posts of their own; and 5% said it depends on the circumstances.
  • Users can be surprised to learn the political leanings of their friends. Some 38% of SNS users have discovered through a friend's posts that his/her political beliefs were different than the user thought they were.

As a rule, the most active and engaged political participants on SNS sit at opposite ends of the ideological spectrum, yet their experiences around political material on SNS are quite similar. Very liberal users and very conservative users are often the most likely to have acted for and against others on SNS. They are also more likely than others to have been surprised by their friends' political views and to be in networks where they agree with what their friends post. Still, even with them, there is as much frequency of disagreement as there is of agreement.

About the Survey

The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from January 20 to February 19, 2012, among a sample of 2,253 adults, age 18 and older. Telephone interviews were conducted in English and Spanish by landline (1,352) and cell phone (901, including 440 without a landline phone). For results based on the total sample, one can say with 95% confidence that the error attributable to sampling is plus or minus 2.3 percentage points. For results based Internet users (n=1,729), the margin of sampling error is plus or minus 2.7 percentage points.
http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Social-networking-and-politics.aspx

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