US court rejects California ban on violent video games

Posted in: Child Protection&Online Safety at 28/06/2011 17:12

The US Supreme Court has struck down a Californian law banning the sale or rental of violent video games to those aged under 18.

The court voted 7-2 to uphold an appeals court ruling that declared the law contrary to free speech rights enshrined in the US Constitution.

Video game publishers challenged the 2005 measure, which never took effect because of legal proceedings.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-13933670

Also see:

Justices Reject Ban on Violent Video Games for Children
The Supreme Court on Monday struck down on First Amendment grounds a California law that banned the sale of violent video games to children. The 7-to-2 decision was the latest in a series of rulings protecting free speech, joining ones on funeral protests, videos showing cruelty to animals and political speech by corporations.

In a second decision Monday, the last day of the term, the court also struck down an Arizona campaign finance law as a violation of the First Amendment.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/28/us/28scotus.html

Violent Video-Game Limits Struck Down by Supreme Court in California Case
The U.S. Supreme Court struck down a California law prohibiting sales of violent video games to minors, saying the ban is an unconstitutional infringement on speech rights.

The nation's highest court today rejected the state's contention that violent games are akin to sexual materials, which the government can restrict to protect children.
www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-06-27/violent-video-game-limits-struck-down-by-supreme-court-in-california-case.html

Parents' Rights Take Stage In Debate Over Violent Video Games
The Supreme Court's decision on Monday to strike down California's ban on selling violent video games to children didn't go over well with groups that say the law would have given parents more control.

"An overwhelmingly high percentage of parents would support a bill that would prevent their kids from walking into a store and buying the most ultra-violent and sexually violent of video games," said Common Sense Media CEO James Steyer. "That decision should be in the hands of parents, not kids or video game vendors, and certainly not the video game ratings board."
http://techdailydose.nationaljournal.com/2011/06/parents-rights-take-stage-in-d.php

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